CAT-05 Flight: Class D to Class D with En-Route Flight Following Pickup

BACK TO THE CAT RATINGS

Description

Conduct a flight from Santa Maria Airport (KSMX) to Bakersfield Meadows Field (KBFL) and obtain VFR Traffic Advisories en-route.

Learning objectives

  • Review radio communications when operating at Class D airports.
  • Review basic VFR navigation skills.
  • Learn how to obtain VFR Traffic Advisory Services while airborne.

Flying the Rating

To successfully complete this rating you must accomplish the following tasks:

  • Fly from KSMX to KBFL.
  • While airborne pick up traffic advisories to KBFL.
  • Inform ATC on initial contact at KSMX that you are performing the CAT-5 Rating.
  • Meet the CAT Ratings Practical Test Standards

Airspace Review

Both KSMX and KBFL are located in Class D airspace. In order to operate in Class D airspace you must obtain two way radio communications with ATC by calling them and having them reply with your callsign.

Communications Review

VFR Traffic Advisories Overview

VFR Traffic Advisories (commonly known as flight following) is a radar service that is provided by Air Traffic Control facilities for VFR aircraft. It provides VFR aircraft with traffic information.

Flight Following is provided by radar equipped Air Traffic Control Facilities. Generally these types of facilities can be classified as 1 of 2 types.

The first is an Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC), commonly referred to as a Center. There are 22 ARTCCs which cover the entire United States.

The second type of radar equipped ATC facility is the Terminal Radar Approach Control Facility (TRACON) commonly referred to as an Approach. TRACONs exist around larger airports and can cover smaller airports near larger airports.

Both ARTCCs and TRACONs can provide flight following services. TRACONs can also provided several other types of radar services to VFR aircraft which will be covered in this flight and in later flights.

Requesting Flight Following

Flight following can be requested on the ground at a towered airport prior to departure or after takeoff. For this flight we will pick up flight following after departure.

In order to pick up flight following you need to know the local frequency for the TRACON or ARTCC facility covering your departure airport. The airport information page for SMX on Skyvector has this information in the Communications section. Otherwise, an official reference would be the Chart Supplement for SMX (also available on the same Skyvector page, although it is still called the Airport Facility Directory on that site for now). Looking at either of these references, we see that the local radar controller frequency is 124.15 with Santa Barbara Approach.

When calling for flight following you should format your initial call as follows:

“(Facility Name), (Callsign), (Position), (Altitude), (Request)”

So for our specific example

“Santa Barbara Approach, Skyhawk 123AB, 10 miles North East of Santa Maria, 7500, request flight following to Bakersfield.”

Air Traffic Control will assign us a squawk code to put in our transponder and shortly there after identify us on radar.

Once we have been radar identified there is nothing for us to do except listen for Air Traffic Control’s transmissions to us regarding traffic or passing us on to another controller.

When you no longer desire flight following simply let ATC know and they will tell you to squawk VFR and send you on your way.

Note that flight following is a workload permitting service. This means that ATC can deny flight following requests or terminate flight following at any time. If this happens you can simply fly the flight without radar services (as we did in the last flight).

Finally, the fact that ATC is providing traffic information does not relieve you of your responsibility to see and avoid other aircraft.

Basic Radar Services

Aircraft arriving into larger airports served by a TRACON have the opportunity to obtain basic radar services. Basic radar services are provided by all TRACON facilities and consists of traffic advisories, limited radar vectoring, and sequencing into the airport.

Basic radar services can be requested in the same way as traffic advisories and are automatically provided to aircraft getting flight following into airports where this service is available.

In our case KBFL offers basic radar services (provided by Bakersfield TRACON). The Chart Supplement provides information on this (look for an R in a circle next to the facility name in the communication section).

When switching to the TRACON that covers your landing airport you should advise them of your intentions at the airport, and that you have the proper ATIS code.

Transcript

N123AB: “Santa Maria Ground, Cessna 123AB, transient parking, north east departure, with papa.”

Santa Maria Ground: “Cessna 123AB, Santa Maria Ground, runway 30 taxi via alpha.”

N123AB: “Runway 30 taxi via alpha.”

When ready for departure:

N123AB: “Santa Maria Tower, Cessna 123AB, holding short Rrunway 30.”

Santa Maria Tower: “Cessna 123AB, Santa Maria Tower, make right crosswind departure, runway 30, cleared for takeoff.”

N123AB: “Cleared for takeoff runway 30, right crosswind departure.”

When clear of the KSMX Class D airspace you can switch off of tower frequency. Switch to 124.15 to obtain flight following.

N123AB: “Santa Barbara Approach, Cessna Skyhawk 123AB, 10 miles north east of Santa Maria, 7500, request flight following to Bakersfield.”

Santa Barbara Approach: “Cessna 123AB, Santa Barbara Approach, squawk 7110.”

N123AB: “Squawk 7110, Cessna 123AB.”

Santa Barbara Approach: “Cessna 123AB, radar contact, 10 miles north east of Santa Maria, Santa Maria altimeter 29.90.”

N123AB: “Radar contact, 123AB.”

Santa Barbara Approach: “Cessna 123AB contact Los Angeles Center on 135.50.”

N123AB: “Contact 135.50.”

Switch to 135.50

N123AB: “Los Angeles Center, Cessna 123AB, level 7500.”

Los Angeles Center: “Cessna N123AB Los Angeles Center, Santa Barbara altimeter 29.91.”

N123AB: “29.91, Cessna 123AB.”

Los Angeles Center: “Cessna 123AB, traffic 2 o’clock 5 miles south bound altitude indicates 6500, type unknown.”

N123AB: “Traffic in sight, Cessna 123AB.”

Los Angeles Center: “Cessna 123AB, Contact Bakersfield Approach, 118.80.”

N123AB: “Contact 118.80, Cessna 123AB.”

Switch to Bakersfield Approach on 118.80. By this time you should have the ATIS for Bakersfield airport.

N123AB: “Bakersfield Approach, Cessna 123AB, level 7500, with zulu.”

Bakersfield Approach: “Cessna 123AB Bakersfield Approach, Bakersfield altimeter 29.80.”

N123AB: “29.80, Cessna 3AB.”

When 10NM From KBFL expect approach to hand you off to tower.

Bakersfield Approach: “Cessna 123AB, contact Bakersfield Tower 118.10.”

N123AB: “Contact tower 118.10, Cessna 123AB.”

N123AB: “Bakersfield Tower, Cessna 123AB, 10 Miles west, landing with zulu”

Bakersfield Tower: “Cessna 123AB, Bakersfield Tower, enter left base runway 30 right, report 2 mile left base.”

N123AB: “Report 2 mile left base, runway 30 right, Cessna 123AB.”

When on a 2 mile left base:

N123AB: “2 mile left base, Cessna 123AB”

Bakersfield Tower: “Cessna 123AB, runway 30 right, cleared to land.”

N123AB: “Cleared to land, runway 30 right, Cessna 123AB.”

When Clear of the Runway.

Bakersfield Tower: “Cessna 123AB, contact ground 121.7.”

N123AB: “Contact ground, Cessna 123AB.”

After switching to ground frequency.

N123AB: “Bakersfield Ground, Cessna 123AB, clear of runway 30 right at golf 4, taxi to transient parking.”

Bakersfield Ground: “Cessna 123AB, Bakersfield Ground, taxi to parking via alpha.”

N123AB: “Taxi to parking via alpha, Cessna 123AB.”

Related Material

Airport Traffic Patterns (Wikipedia)

How to Fly a Traffic Pattern

Skyvector.com

Web site containing scrollable, zoomable VFR and IFR charts

VFR Cruising Altitudes

Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge – Navigation

FAA publication on basic and advanced VFR navigation skills.

VFR Flight Planning and Navigation Workshop

Youtube recording of a live workshop conducted by PilotEdge covering VFR flight planning and navigation methods.